RegularEgg

Monday, January 31, 2005

Metachromatic Leukodystrophy

Rare inherited metabolic disease in which the lack of a key enzyme causes loss of the protective myelin sheath from the white matter of the brain, resulting in psychological disturbances, mental deterioration, and sensory and motor defects. The absence of the enzyme cerebroside sulfatase (arylsulfatase A) allows certain specialized lipids (sphingolipids) to

Molde

Town and seat of Møre og Romsdal fylke (county), western Norway. It lies along Molde Fjord, an inlet of the Norwegian Sea. A port since the 15th century, Molde was partially destroyed by fire in 1916, damaged during World War II, then rebuilt completely. During April 1940 it was the temporary home of the Norwegian government. Local industry includes fish export, textile mills, and furniture

Saturday, January 29, 2005

Forcados River

River, a major navigable channel of the Niger Delta, southern Nigeria. It leaves the main course of the Niger River about 20 miles (32 km) downstream from Aboh and flows through zones of freshwater swamps, mangrove swamps, and coastal sand ridges before completing its 123-mile (198-kilometre) westerly course to the Bight of Benin. Since about 1900 it has been the chief link for small ship

Friday, January 28, 2005

Manama

Arabic  Al-manamah,   capital and largest city of the state and emirate of Bahrain. It lies at the northeast tip of Bahrain island, in the Persian Gulf. About one-third of the emirate's population lives in the city. First mentioned in Islamic chronicles about AD 1345, it was taken by the Portuguese (1521) and by the Persians (1602). It has been held, with brief interruptions, by the ruling Al Khalifah dynasty since 1783. Because

Thursday, January 27, 2005

Rickey, Branch

Rickey started his professional playing career while studying at Ohio Wesleyan University, spent two seasons (1906–07) in the American

Wednesday, January 26, 2005

Pappenheim, Gottfried Heinrich, Count (graf) Zu

Pappenheim served with the Catholic League, headed by the elector Maximilian I of Bavaria and commanded by Johann Tserclaes, Graf von Tilly. Idolized by his regiment of cuirassiers, the Pappenheimers, he proved a tempestuous cavalry officer, always

Monday, January 24, 2005

Mitaka

City, Tokyo to (metropolis), Honshu, Japan. It lies on the western border of Tokyo city. The city developed from settlements in the rice paddies of the Musashino plateau during the Tokugawa period (1603–1867). It served as a hawking field, and its name is Japanese for “three hawks.” The Mitaka station on the Chuo Line (railway) was opened in 1931, and industry subsequently developed there. Mitaka's

Tracy, Benjamin F(ranklin)

Tracy began his career as a lawyer; he was admitted to the bar in 1851 and served as district attorney of Tioga County, N.Y., from 1853 to 1859. A founder of the local Republican Party, he served briefly in the state legislature (1862) and fought for the Union

Saturday, January 22, 2005

Zanzibar

City and port of the island of Zanzibar, Tanzania. The island's principal port and commercial centre, it is on the western side of the island behind a well-protected natural deepwater harbour. In 1824 Sultan Sa'id ibn Sultan of Oman established his capital there, shifting it from Muscat on the Arabian Peninsula. During the remainder of the 19th century, the city flourished as the

Thursday, January 20, 2005

Rwanda, Flag Of

Under the Belgian colonial regime, the elite Tutsi minority ruled the social, political, and economic life of Rwanda. The majority Hutu eventually organized a revolt against this feudal system, which culminated in a civil war that began on November 1, 1959. On March 23, 1960, the new Provisional Special Council, which was established by the Belgians and dominated by Hutu members,

Indian Philosophy

The systems of thought and reflection that were developed by the civilizations of the Indian subcontinent. They include both orthodox (astika) systems, namely, the Nyaya, Vaisesika, Samkhya, Yoga, Purva-mimamsa, and Vedanta schools of philosophy, and unorthodox (nastika) systems, such as Buddhism and Jainism. Indian thought has been concerned with various philosophical problems,

Wednesday, January 19, 2005

Checks And Balances

Principle of government under which separate branches are empowered to prevent actions by other branches and are induced to share power. Checks and balances are applied primarily in constitutional governments. They are of fundamental importance in tripartite governments, such as that of the United States, which separate powers among legislative, executive,

Neoevolutionism

School of anthropological thought concerned with long-term, directional, “evolutionary” culture change and with the regular patterns of development that may be seen in unrelated, widely separated cultures. Neoevolutionist anthropology, a development of the mid-20th century, addresses the relation between the long-term “progressive” change (general evolution) characteristic

Monday, January 17, 2005

Zambezi River, Physiography

The Zambezi rises out of a marshy bog near Kalene Hill, Zambia, about 4,800 feet (1,460 metres) above sea level, and flows some 20 miles before entering Angola, through which it runs for more than 175 miles. In this first section of its course, the river is met by more than a dozen tributaries of varying sizes. Shortly after reentering Zambia, the river flows over the Chavuma Falls and enters

Sunday, January 16, 2005

Hunan, Industry

The main coal measures are located in the south. Coal was little developed

Friday, January 14, 2005

Babak

Iranian Papak  leader of the Iranian Khorram-dinan, a religious sect that arose following the execution of Abu Muslim, who had rebelled against the 'Abbasid caliphate. Denying that Abu Muslim was dead, the sect predicted that he would return to spread justice throughout the world. Babak led a new revolt against the 'Abbasids that was put down in 837.

Thursday, January 13, 2005

Creativity

A creative person is usually very intelligent in the ordinary sense of the term and can meet the problems of life as rationally as anyone can, but often he refuses to let intellect rule; he relies strongly on intuition, and he respects the irrational in himself and others. Above a certain level, intelligence seems to have little correlation with creativity—i.e., a highly

Wednesday, January 12, 2005

River, Deltas and time

The most significant effect is that the site of deposition shifts dramatically with time.

Monday, January 10, 2005

Interior Design

The art of interior design encompasses all of the fixed and movable ornamental objects that form an integral part of the inside of any human habitation. It is essential to remember that much of what today is classified as art and exhibited in galleries and museums was originally used to furnish interiors. Paintings were usually ordered by size and frequently by

Sprint

Racers compete in groups of two (sometimes called a match sprint) or three, and they frequently spend the early laps of the race moving relatively slowly and trying to manoeuvre their opponents into the lead, while at the same time following close

Sunday, January 09, 2005

Antaimoro

Also spelled  Antimorona,   a Malagasy people living on and near the southeastern coast of Madagascar. Numbering about 350,000 in the late 20th century, the Antaimoro (“People of the Coast”) speak one of the Malagasy languages, a group of closely related Western Austronesian languages. Traditionally the Antaimoro were ruled by five families of Arabic origin who probably came to Madagascar at different

Saturday, January 08, 2005

Pax

In Roman religion, personification of peace, probably recognized as a deity for the first time by the emperor Augustus, in whose reign much was made of the establishment of political calm. An altar of Pax Augusta (the Ara Pacis) was dedicated in 9 BC and a great temple of Pax completed by the emperor Vespasian in AD 75.

Friday, January 07, 2005

Kschessinska, Mathilde

Kschessinska also spelled  Kshessinska,  Russian  in full Mathilda-maria Feliksovna Kshesinskaya  prima ballerina assoluta of the Imperial Russian Ballet and the first Russian dancer to master 32 consecutive fouettés en tournant (“whipped turns” done in place and on one leg), a feat previously performed only by Italian dancers and considered in that era the supreme achievement in dance

Thursday, January 06, 2005

Ear, Human, Nerves

The seventh cranial nerve, called the facial nerve, passes by a somewhat circuitous route through the facial canal in the petrous portion of the temporal bone on its way from the brain stem to the muscles of expression of the face. A small but important branch, the chorda tympani nerve, emerges from the canal into the middle ear cavity and runs forward along the inner

Wednesday, January 05, 2005

Thomas, W(illiam) I(saac)

Thomas taught sociology at the University of Chicago (1895–1918), the New School for Social Research, New York City (1923–28), and Harvard University (1936–37). His Sex and

Rawi

One or more rawis attached themselves to a particular poet and learned his works by heart. They then recited and explained the poet's verse before a wider audience. Such an attachment often became an apprenticeship,

Monday, January 03, 2005

Pacific Islands, Climate

To describe the climate as tropical and oceanic is to stress the influence of the lower latitudes and the tremendous expanse of the sea. Humidity and temperature tend to be high and are generally uniform throughout the year. Regional differentiation in climate is linked principally to rainfall patterns. Here, factors of altitude and longitude, as well as latitude,

Sunday, January 02, 2005

Biblical Literature, The physical aspects of New Testament texts

To establish the reliability of the text of ancient manuscripts in order to reach the text that the author originally wrote (or, rather, dictated) involves the physical aspects of the texts: collection, collation of differences or variant readings in manuscripts, and comparison in matters of dating, geographical origins, and the amount of editing or revision noted,

Saturday, January 01, 2005

Gumma

Soft, granulomatous, tumourlike mass, sometimes appearing during the late stages of syphilis, that occurs most often beneath the skin and mucous membranes but that may also be found in the bones, nervous system, and other organs and tissues. See also syphilis.